Vaccinations

Vaccinations And Your Pet:

At Glendale Veterinary Hospital, we strive to keep your pets in the best of health. Our vaccination and wellness programs are designed so that your pets remain fit, strong and disease-free. Vaccinations help protect your pet from a number of potentially serious and even fatal diseases. Not only that, vaccinations cost considerably less than the treatments available for the diseases pets are normally vaccinated against. Every pet should be vaccinated – even indoor dogs and cats can be exposed to infectious diseases.

 Vaccines contain viruses or bacteria that have been modified so that they will not cause the disease. When a pet is vaccinated, it stimulates two parts of their immune system. One is the production of antibodies; the other is the stimulation of cell-mediated immunity, which, in combination, mounts a response against the bacteria or virus in question. If your pet is later exposed to that disease, the two parts of the immune system react quickly to destroy the disease-causing agent.

 The protection provided by a vaccine gradually declines over time. Your pet needs regular “booster” vaccinations to ensure ongoing immunity from disease.

 Although no one can guarantee that a vaccine will fully protect an animal against a given disease, vaccinations have proven to be the simplest, safest and most effective means of preventing a number of diseases in pets.

 It is important to administer vaccines only to healthy pets. If your pet is already suffering from an illness, or is receiving an antibiotic, their immune system may not be able to respond to the vaccine. For that reason, our veterinarians will exam your pet prior to vaccinating.

 Vaccination reactions, unfortunately, can occur in rare instances. Like a drug, a vaccine is capable of causing an adverse reaction. Some of these reactions are mild (some discomfort at the injection site, lethargy or loss of appetite), however, some can be more severe (allergic reaction, immunologic reactions). If your pet has reacted to a vaccine in the past it is important to relay that information to us.

 We understand that some people still may desire to limit the amount of vaccines that are given to their pet. We at Glendale also believe strongly in not over-vaccinating your pet. There is a test available that measures the amount of antibodies from their vaccines that your pet has in their system. For a long time, these tests were only available from an outside laboratory. Fortunately Glendale has now acquired the ability to check your dog’s immune reaction to the DAP vaccine. Unfortunately an in-clinic titre test is not yet available for Leptospirosis, and will never be able to be done for Rabies due to legality issues.

 Please ask us if you have any concerns about the vaccines we give and the schedule we follow.

Puppies:

8 Weeks: Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza (DAPP – given in 1 injection)

12 Weeks: Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza (DAPP – given in 1 injection), Leptospirosis

16 Weeks: Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza (DAPP – given in 1 injection), Leptospirosis and Rabies

 

Kittens:

8 Weeks: Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Parvovirus (RCP – given in 1 injection), Feline Leukemia

12 Weeks: Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Parvovirus (RCP – given in 1 injection), Feline Leukemia

16 Weeks: Rabies

 

At Glendale we are VERY conscious and concerned about NOT over vaccinating your pet. For dogs, Leptospirosis is a yearly vaccine, but once puppies finish their full puppy set of vaccines, we will boost these again in 1 year, and then we vaccinate for DAPP and Rabies every 3 years. We also offer a titre test for the DAPP vaccine that tests the levels of antibodies your pet has to these diseases. If the test shows that your pet has enough antibodies to provide protection for your pet, we will not need to vaccinate. For cats, Rabies is a yearly vaccine, but once the kitten set of vaccines is complete, they are boostered 1 year later and then they switch to being given every 3 years. The feline leukemia vaccine protocol can vary based on the exposure risk faced by your individual pet.

 It has been estimated that up to 90% of health problems in people are preventable. There is growing evidence to suggest that this is also true for our pets. If these recommendations are taken to heart, and acted upon, your pet will live a much longer, happier life with fewer problems to deal with, and fewer serious trips to see us. Prevention is always better than treatment.

 

Vaccinations

Vaccinations And Your Pet:

At Glendale Veterinary Hospital, we strive to keep your pets in the best of health. Our vaccination and wellness programs are designed so that your pets remain fit, strong and disease-free. Vaccinations help protect your pet from a number of potentially serious and even fatal diseases. Not only that, vaccinations cost considerably less than the treatments available for the diseases pets are normally vaccinated against. Every pet should be vaccinated – even indoor dogs and cats can be exposed to infectious diseases.

 Vaccines contain viruses or bacteria that have been modified so that they will not cause the disease. When a pet is vaccinated, it stimulates two parts of their immune system. One is the production of antibodies; the other is the stimulation of cell-mediated immunity, which, in combination, mounts a response against the bacteria or virus in question. If your pet is later exposed to that disease, the two parts of the immune system react quickly to destroy the disease-causing agent.

 The protection provided by a vaccine gradually declines over time. Your pet needs regular “booster” vaccinations to ensure ongoing immunity from disease.

 Although no one can guarantee that a vaccine will fully protect an animal against a given disease, vaccinations have proven to be the simplest, safest and most effective means of preventing a number of diseases in pets.

 It is important to administer vaccines only to healthy pets. If your pet is already suffering from an illness, or is receiving an antibiotic, their immune system may not be able to respond to the vaccine. For that reason, our veterinarians will exam your pet prior to vaccinating.

 Vaccination reactions, unfortunately, can occur in rare instances. Like a drug, a vaccine is capable of causing an adverse reaction. Some of these reactions are mild (some discomfort at the injection site, lethargy or loss of appetite), however, some can be more severe (allergic reaction, immunologic reactions). If your pet has reacted to a vaccine in the past it is important to relay that information to us.

 We understand that some people still may desire to limit the amount of vaccines that are given to their pet. We at Glendale also believe strongly in not over-vaccinating your pet. There is a test available that measures the amount of antibodies from their vaccines that your pet has in their system. For a long time, these tests were only available from an outside laboratory. Fortunately Glendale has now acquired the ability to check your dog’s immune reaction to the DAP vaccine. Unfortunately an in-clinic titre test is not yet available for Leptospirosis, and will never be able to be done for Rabies due to legality issues.

 Please ask us if you have any concerns about the vaccines we give and the schedule we follow.

Puppies:

8 Weeks: Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza (DAPP – given in 1 injection)

12 Weeks: Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza (DAPP – given in 1 injection), Leptospirosis

16 Weeks: Distemper, Adenovirus, Parvovirus, Parainfluenza (DAPP – given in 1 injection), Leptospirosis and Rabies

 

Kittens:

8 Weeks: Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Parvovirus (RCP – given in 1 injection), Feline Leukemia

12 Weeks: Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Parvovirus (RCP – given in 1 injection), Feline Leukemia

16 Weeks: Rabies

 

At Glendale we are VERY conscious and concerned about NOT over vaccinating your pet. For dogs, Leptospirosis is a yearly vaccine, but once puppies finish their full puppy set of vaccines, we will boost these again in 1 year, and then we vaccinate for DAPP and Rabies every 3 years. We also offer a titre test for the DAPP vaccine that tests the levels of antibodies your pet has to these diseases. If the test shows that your pet has enough antibodies to provide protection for your pet, we will not need to vaccinate. For cats, Rabies is a yearly vaccine, but once the kitten set of vaccines is complete, they are boostered 1 year later and then they switch to being given every 3 years. The feline leukemia vaccine protocol can vary based on the exposure risk faced by your individual pet.

 It has been estimated that up to 90% of health problems in people are preventable. There is growing evidence to suggest that this is also true for our pets. If these recommendations are taken to heart, and acted upon, your pet will live a much longer, happier life with fewer problems to deal with, and fewer serious trips to see us. Prevention is always better than treatment.