Spaying/Neutering (Ovariohysterectomy/Castration)

It’s heartbreaking to think that over 50,000 cats and dogs in Canadian shelters are put to sleep every year because they don’t have a home. This 2010 statistic is from the Federation for Humane Societies; and the number keeps growing every year. One of the best solutions to a problem such as this is to spay or neuter your pet now. Glendale recommends performing an ovariohysterectomy (spay) or castration (neuter)  around 6 months of age.

Why should I spay or neuter my pet? Other than the obvious population control reasons, there are also many health benefits to spaying or neutering your pet. Studies show that sterilized pets live longer, happier lives. In males, it reduces the risk of prostate disease and eliminates the risk testicular cancer and in females it decreases the risk of mammary cancer, ovarian cancer, and a condition called pyometra. A spayed or neutered pet is less likely to wander around the neighbourhood decreasing the chance of being hit by a passing vehicle or getting lost. To some extent, it helps control unwanted behaviours such as aggression in dogs – particularly towards other dogs, mounting and for male cats, prevents the male behaviour of spraying a most foul-smelling urine in your home.  Overall, spaying or neutering your pet makes the human-animal bond closer and you have a more pleasant animal companion.

In spite of these benefits, we understand that some people still have some concerns regarding spaying and neutering. There are some who argue that neutering pets makes them fat and lazy.

Neutering might reduce an animal’s activity level, but this does not result in weight gain.

A healthy diet and sufficient exercise can help your pet maintain a healthy weight.  Some people have been told that their female should be allowed to have a litter of puppies or kittens.

It won’t make her a better companion, and it will increase the likelihood that she will develop mammary cancer. Spaying your female before she goes into heat even once greatly reduces the risk of her developing mammary cancer and also makes the spaying surgery faster and less complicated.

It’s heartbreaking to think that over 50,000 cats and dogs in Canadian shelters are put to sleep every year because they don’t have a home. This 2010 statistic is from the Federation for Humane Societies; and the number keeps growing every year. One of the best solutions to a problem such as this is to spay or neuter your pet now. Glendale recommends performing an ovariohysterectomy (spay) or castration (neuter)  around 6 months of age.